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MY VERY LATEST TO COME OUT OF THE RENDERER !!!

CLICK ON THE IMAGE BELOW TO SEE THE FULL SIZED HIGH DETAILED VERSION.

"REBUILDING CAPRICA AFTER THE FIRST CYLON WAR "

A photorealistic exterior scene of the Battlestar Galactica returning home to CAprica as the city is being rebuilt. Created in 3DSMAX. Fire, smoke and explosion fx created using Pyrocluster plugin, enhanced via sunlight system/photometric lights, radiosity calculated indirect lighting, ray tracing of direct lights and high quality textures. see large version >

Greetings and Salutations!

Welcome tomy online gallery. Although most of the artwork on this website is from the last year this gallery represents a comprehensive array of my 3D artwork, both past and present.

3D. One of my favorite things...

Since 1994 I've been addicted to 3D modeling and rendering. I love it! The perfect fusion of art and technology. I think that's why I love it so much and I sincerly hope it shows in the quality and quantity of the work contained in this gallery.

Research and Realism...

One of the most important things I've learned is before I model a single polygon I take the time to research and gather all the reference I can find on my subject. Then I select what elements are needed for my project then compose them into a dramatic composition that compliments both styling and realism.

Attention to detail...

They say ' the devil is in the details'. But lack of details in the world of 3D and real-time gaming can be disasterous. I am all about the details (i.e. Carnevale Jester's Wedding Day). After ref and research I compose the scene on paper and list all the nessecary primary objects and elements. One by one I create the very best models and textures I can (i.e. wild west). Then I create a "blocked out" version of the main scene with stand-in objects and place the finals in the scene as they are finished. While I'm doing that I create a lighting matrix that best suits the scene and refine it as I go to achieve realistic/dramatic lighting.

Dramatic Lighting...

One of the biggest deficiencies I still see in video games is poor or under developed lighting. My personal philosophy is that a little effort to create realistic or dramatic lighting will deepen player imersion, evoke emotional responses and enhance enjoyment. Even the best modeling and texturing can look dull or even uninspired if improperly illuminated. www.moldtestingcolumbusoh.com
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One of my strong points is a natural sense of lighting and shadowing of a scene. I'm not afraid to have dark corners and spooky or subdued lighting, even if it obscures some details in the set. They key is to evoke an emotional response or set the tone of the scene with lighting just as much as mesh or textures. In summary I believe lighting should be based in reality (at least as a starting point), try to evoke emotion/setting and be natural, not look like either an after-thought or overly staged.

Pure 3D Rendering...

I use this term "Pure 3D Rendering" to describe my philosophy regarding my 3D art. What you see is almost always straight out of the Maya or 3DSMAX renderer. Why? Call me a pureist but in animation or realtime gaming such post-pipeline retouching or complex layering/compositing of images is not possible like it is in Photoshop. As a consequence nearly all of my scenes can be rendered into animation. The only exception is when a scene must be broken down in Max or Maya so it won't crash my PC by exhausting system resources.



All content on this website copyright 1996-2009 Robert K. Sharo unless otherwise noted.